Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship

A transformative, year-long professional learning experience for New York City metro-area high school humanities teachers who want to grow their skills and build excellence for their students.

Overview

Humanities instruction explores the complexity of the human experience, and helps students to be more perceptive, empathic, and empowered as they chart their path to a more fulfilling life. The Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship helps experienced high school humanities teachers reignite a love for their craft, by connecting them to their content and helping them thrive in their teaching with a community of similarly motivated colleagues.


The Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship welcomes high school social studies teachers from across the New York metro area who are interested in nourishing their intellectual souls by developing their history content and pedagogy knowledge through equity-focused learning communities, exploring New York cultural institutions, and partnering with historians in the field.


“I could not have asked for more: I am reinvigorated as a teacher, I have a ton of new tools in my tool belt, and I have new colleagues and friends to bounce ideas off.”

Program Experience

The Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship is a one year program, consisting of the following benefits:

  • The summer seminar: The two week seminar includes humanities content instruction from experts in the field, workshops grounded in rigorous content pedagogy and visits to renowned cultural institutions. It is held at Relay Graduate School of Education in New York City.
  • Intersessions: Fellows come together for Saturday workshops in October, December, February and May.
  • Coaching: Video-based coaching sessions throughout the school year with expert practitioners and peers
  • Stipend: A $2,000 stipend
  • Continuing education credits: 60-75 NY CTLE continuing education hours 

Come learn more at our information sessions, held on Zoom. Click here to sign-up

  • Wed. Nov. 30, 2022, 5:30-6:15pm
  • Tues. Dec. 13, 2022, 5:30-6:15pm
  • Mon. Jan. 9, 2023, 5:30 PM 6:15pm
  • Thurs. Jan. 26, 6:00 PM - 6:45 pm   
“This is definitely worth two weeks of my summer. It's one of the best workshops that I've attended and I'm very lucky to be part of this group. I'm excited to bring what I learn here to my students.”

Learning Experience

The Hollyhock Fellowship is a one-year experience consisting of three components:

  • Summer Seminar at Relay GSE
  • Four Saturday intersessions
  • Virtual coaching during the school year.

Summer Seminar 2023

July 17 - 21 & July 24-28, 2023


At the Hollyhock Summer Seminar, fellows participate in two weeks of exciting, practice-based professional development. The seminar engages the fellows in rich history content and pedagogy. The content focus will be American history, with the theme “Liberty and Justice for All”: American Stories of Striving for Equity and Justice.

The pedagogy courses will focus on building rigor to build equity:

  • Facilitating close reading and discourse
  • Developing historical thinking using the Four Question Method
  • Integrating equity-focused and culturally responsive teaching in our pedagogy
"The guest speakers were absolutely phenomenal. I am a huge fan of the diversity of professors.”

Summer Seminar Activities

Cultural Institution Visits: Fellows will visit renowned museums and community cultural institutions to learn from their exhibits, get tours from curators and experts to deepen their content knowledge, analyze and interpret the arguments of the exhibits and explore ways to connect the cultural institution to their classrooms.

For example:

  • The Museum of the City of NY
  • The New York Historical Society
  • The Gilder-Lehrman Archives
  • The National Museum of the American Indian
  • The Museum of the Chinese in America

Workshops: Fellows engage in rigorous, practice-based, content pedagogy workshops. Fellows will develop their own lessons and practice executing them and receive feedback from faculty and colleagues.

 

Daily Discourse: Fellows will engage in close readings on ideas and research in education and pedagogy and will then facilitate rigorous discussion amongst themselves on these thought-provoking topics.

Community Building, Mindfulness and Wellness: Fellows will engage in daily community building, mindfulness and wellness activities for their own participation and to learn ones that they can bring back to their students.

“This has been one of the best professional development experiences that I've attended!”

During the School Year

Intersessions: Fellows will participate in four Saturday intersessions in October, December, February and May. These intersessions will continue the development work begun in the summer with practice labs, video feedback and workshops around building leadership skills. in coaching teachers and leading professional development sessions. Fellows will also continue to work with New York cultural institutions.

Year-Long Coaching: Instructional coaching supports fellows throughout the school year. As part of a networked professional community, fellows meet virtually each month with their expert instructional coaches and other fellows. Fellows will upload videos of their classroom teaching in order to get feedback and to improve instructional practice.  They will share lesson materials, and delve into issues of equity in their classroom, while building a community with each other that enriches their experience in the education profession.

Summer Seminar

July 17-21, 2023 and

July 24-28, 2023

Intersessions

Saturday, Oct. 14, 2023

Saturday, Dec. 9, 2023

Saturday,  Feb. 10, 2024

Saturday, May 18, 2024

Application Opens for 2023-24

November 1st, 2022

Eligibility Requirements

  • Apply as a high school history or social studies teacher with at least three years of teaching experience.
  • Teach at a New York City metro area high school where more than 50% of the students qualify for free and reduced price lunch
  • Maintain at least a part-time classroom teaching position at your current school site for the duration of the fellowship
  • Attend the Summer Seminar
  • Participate in and prepare fully for all of the school-year, video-conference coaching sessions, and Saturday workshops
  • Have access to a computer or tablet that can support the technology interface
“Powerful and passionate presentations and facilitations. I was completely engaged, challenged, and inspired.”

Criteria for Selection

  • A belief in personal responsibility to work for equitable outcomes for all students
  • Demonstrated growth mindset to continuously improve with openness to feedback and a willingness to practice and to be videoed while teaching.
  • Investment in collaborating with a community of colleagues
  • A belief in equitable outcomes for all students
  • Commitment to professional growth as a  classroom teacher and as a leading teacher beyond the classroom
  • Support from school administration to participate fully during the summer seminar and school year and bring what you learned back to your school

Application Timeline

Applications open each year in November and close in early March.

2023 Application


Click here to view or start your 2023 application to the Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship

How do I contact Relay about the Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship?

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To request more information, please email us at jverrilli@relay.edu and put “Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship” in the subject line.

When are the Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship applications available?

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Applications open for the 2023-24 cohort on November 1, 2022.

Should I apply if I am not sure I can make a commitment to participate in all activities in summer and across the year?

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We prefer that teachers only apply if they can fully commit to attending the entire two-week summer seminar, the Year-long coaching and Saturday workshops.

What is the difference between the Stanford Hollyhock Fellowship and the Relay Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship?

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The Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship is a special program hosted by the Relay Graduate School of Education for experienced humanities teachers in the New York Metro area. It is designed to focus on developing just high school history/social studies teachers. The Hollyhock Fellowship is a one-year program. The Stanford Hollyhock program is a national two-year program hosted by Stanford University’s Center to Support Excellence in Teaching for school-based teams of teachers in English, History, Math and Science. Both programs are possible because of the generous support of the Hollyhock Foundation.

Why is the eligibility only for teachers who have at least 3 years of teaching experience?

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Experienced teachers need support and opportunities for growth to help them thrive in the classroom. We want to work with teachers who are still seeking to grow and improve for their students and to help them become much-needed teacher leaders in their schools.

For the 2023-24 school year, we only offer fellowships to high school teachers who teach in history/social studies.


What is a typical day like at the Hollyhock Summer Seminar?

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The Institute typically runs from 9:00 am until 4:30 pm Monday through Friday with additional opportunities for socializing and community-building activities on the weekday evenings. Fellows will attend classes at the Relay Graduate School of Education Campus on 25 Broadway in lower Manhattan. We will have professional development sessions where we deep-dive into content, participate in daily intellectual discourse on relevant topics and work on practice-based pedagogy. Daily coffee, beverages, snacks and lunch will be provided each day. There will also be afternoon trips to NY’s renowned cultural institutions on certain days of the week.


Our hope is that all these experiences will build a community of teaching professionals that lasts long after the two-week summer institute ends.


What are the dates for the Summer Seminar and the Saturday Intersessions?

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In 2023, the Hollyhock Summer Seminar will be held on July 17th - July 21st, 2023 and July 24th - July 28th, 2023. Classes will run from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM. There are no classes on the weekends. The Saturday Intersessions will take place on Oct. 14, 2023, Dec. 9, 2023, Feb. 10, 2024, and May 18, 2024. They will run from 9:30 AM to 4:30 PM. Our current plan is for all classes to be in-person at Relay Graduate School of Education’s campus, 25 Broadway, NY, NY 10011.

What kinds of things do I need to do to prepare for the summer institute if I am accepted?

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Fellows are invited to write a short biography about themselves and their school for our website. Additionally, we ask that fellows bring teaching materials that they will work with next year as we will be doing lesson planning and curriculum design work. We will also ask all fellows to submit a video of themselves classroom teaching from the current school year. There will also be shared books and readings to complete and links to tasks prior to arrival in July for the Summer Seminar. Each year the preparation varies.

How do the continuing education units (CTE’s) I earn at Relay Hollyhock get documented?

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Relay will email each Hollyhock Fellow a transcript with a record of the CTE’s earned after each summer and each school year. Fellows can use this transcript as verification of their professional learning hours from Hollyhock. Please note that these are not graduate credits as fellows are not enrolled at Relay as graduate students. Hollyhock fellows will also need to keep track of their own CTE documentation throughout the fellowship.

May I apply if I am a SPED or ESL teacher?

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If you are a SPED or ESL educator who teaches history/social studies then you may apply. At this time, we do not offer separate sessions for SPED or ESL teachers.

2022-23 Hollyhock Cohort

Relay is excited to welcome these 21 educators from NY and NJ to learn and grow as a community in New York City.

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Ginette Amezquita

Uncommon Leadership Charter HS, Brooklyn, NY

Born in the Dominican Republic, Gínette Amezquita considers herself a “real” New Yorker since migrating at the age of four. Upon finishing undergrad at Fordham University, Gínette taught at a small Jesuit middle school and then moved to Uncommon Schools. Fast forward twelve years, and Gínette is proud to say that she has taught thousands of Brooklyn youth spanning grades 5-12! Gínette’s teaching superpower is her ability to “read the room” and engage seniors from her Latin American studies course in lively and memorable discussions, while creating safe spaces for vulnerability to coexist with learning. Gínette currently serves as the Head of Lower School at Uncommon Leadership Charter HS where she spearheads many school culture initiatives.

Ginette Amezquita

Uncommon Leadership Charter HS, Brooklyn, NY
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Jasmine Carsky

Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, Bronx, NY

Jasmine Carsky is going into her eighth year at the Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, where she has been primarily teaching 9th grade Global History, and recently became part of the 11th grade US History team. She did not take any US History courses in the schools she attended in West Africa, so she is especially thankful for this opportunity to learn the curriculum alongside her students. Her teaching super power is the ability to incorporate mindful moments in her lessons so that students feel empowered to be more present, aware, and engaged in their learning. She also emphasizes the amazing learning that happens outside of the classroom, and makes sure to take students on cultural experiences in and out of New York, and even to other countries.


Jasmine Carsky

Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, Bronx, NY
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Daryn Cohen

Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice,  Brooklyn, NY

Daryn Cohen (she/her) teaches at the Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice in Downtown Brooklyn. She has been teaching for 11 years, and while Global History is her bread and butter content (having taught at least one section of it for 11 years), she has also taught Global 1 & 2, Government, and Economics. Her teaching superpower is her enthusiasm. She loves what she does, and loves what she teaches, and this makes her so excited to share history with her students. Her goal is to make "not a history person" students realize there is no such thing!


Daryn Cohen

Urban Assembly School for Law and Justice,  Brooklyn, NY
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Carmen Cruz

Sunset Park HS, Brooklyn, NY

Carmen Cruz works at Sunset Park High School in Brooklyn, New York as a 10th grade Humanities Special Education teacher, and has been teaching in the NY Department of Education for 10 years. She earned her bachelor’s degree at Brooklyn College, and her master’s degree at St. John’s University. Her ultimate goal is to become a teacher of teachers and guide them through culturally responsive work earlier in their careers. That is why she became a New Teacher Mentor and Cooperating teacher at her school. It is also why she believes her teaching superpower is an education empath. In order to be a strong educator, Carmen believes one must listen to the changing needs of young people, adapt the curricula and culture to support the cultivation of those needs, and teach them to advocate for themselves.


Carmen Cruz

Sunset Park HS, Brooklyn, NY
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Louie Dane

Kipp Washington Heights Middle School, Manhattan, NY

Born and raised in Manhattan, Louie Dane is currently in his 3rd year teaching at KIPP Washington Heights Middle School. A graduate of University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism, Louie worked as a cameraman and editor for news channels in the city before moving to Israel in the spring of 2016 and earning an M.A. in TESOL from Tel Aviv University. Louie is greatly passionate about and sees his super powers in language learning, sports, and educating future generations of critical thinkers.


Louie Dane

Kipp Washington Heights Middle School, Manhattan, NY
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Joseph Davis

Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, Bronx, NY

Joseph Davis is a 3rd year Social Studies teacher at the Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science in the Bronx. Over the last 3 years he has been a part of an effort at his school to further develop and complicate their Global History curriculum. His teaching superpower is creating learning environments that are grounded in strong relationships that help sustain challenging discussions for learners.


Joseph Davis

Urban Assembly School for Applied Math and Science, Bronx, NY
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Rebecca Egler

KIPP NYC College Prep, Bronx, NY

Rebecca Egler has taught at KIPP NYC College Prep since 2011 and has been lucky enough to gain experience in a variety of courses including, Global History, Geography, United States History, and Government. Despite all of this time in the Bronx, she is a Brooklyn girl at heart, so you can often find her on the 4 train, or in Prospect Park with her family. Her teaching superpower is her ability and love for conducting a detective-like search for new and engaging sources, which regularly brings her to every corner of the internet.


Rebecca Egler

KIPP NYC College Prep, Bronx, NY
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Abigail Fordyce

New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities IV, Queens, NY

Abigail Fordyce is currently an 11th grade US History teacher and AP US History teacher. She is in her second year at New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities IV in Rockaway, Queens. Her teaching superpower is the strong connection she makes with the students in her classes. She tries everyday to create a classroom space that is welcoming to all students.


Abigail Fordyce

New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities IV, Queens, NY
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Alex Frank

KIPP NYC College Prep, Bronx, NY

Alex Frank is in his 8th year teaching History at the high school level. Currently he teaches Global, U.S., and AP U.S. History at New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II. He believes that his teaching superpower is using humor, music, pop culture, and the power of the Force to help young humans connect with the fascinating and interconnected history of the galaxy.


Alex Frank

KIPP NYC College Prep, Bronx, NY
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Alexa Jacobsen

People's Prep Charter School, Newark, NJ

Alexa Jacobsen is a 3rd year teacher at People's Prep Charter School in Newark, NJ. She teaches US History II and Foundations of History to 9th-12th graders. She has been working there since graduating from Montclair State University. Her teaching superpower is getting 100% of her students to participate in class discussions every week.


Alexa Jacobsen

People's Prep Charter School, Newark, NJ
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Scott Kern

North Star Academy Washington Park HS, Newark NJ

Scott Kern lives in Brooklyn and has been teaching in Newark, NJ at North Star Academy for 15 years. He first taught middle school history and now teaches high school AP U.S. History. Some of the most influential people in his life have been his teachers during his own high school experience. His history teachers in particular really sparked a passion for the subject and how it shapes and informs our world today. He would love his teaching superpower to be the ability to see his students’ thinking in class – it would help him encourage great ideas from reluctant voices, determine if there is a gap between what he’s expecting and what students are thinking, and would make it so much easier to help students who are struggling.


Scott Kern

North Star Academy Washington Park HS, Newark NJ
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Risa Lader

Uncommon Charter High School, Brooklyn, NY

Risa Lader has been teaching for 7 years. For the past 4 years she has been teaching at Uncommon Charter High School In Brooklyn and previous to that she was teaching at a high school in North Philly for three years. She sees her teaching superpower as building strong and effective student relationships.


Risa Lader

Uncommon Charter High School, Brooklyn, NY
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Emily Lake

High School of Fashion Industries, Manhattan, NY

Emily Lake teaches at the High School of Fashion Industries and has been teaching in New York City public schools for five years. Four of those years were teaching middle school, and this year she has been enjoying a new adventure teaching high school. In the past, she served as United Federation of Teachers Chapter Leader, Student Council Advisor, and was also a James Madison Fellow for Teachers of the Constitution. Her teaching superpower is forming strong relationships with her students and getting them excited about history.


Emily Lake

High School of Fashion Industries, Manhattan, NY
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Duncan Miller

North Star Academy Washington Park HS, Newark NJ

After a decade of history instruction, Duncan Miller is thrilled to deepen his content and pedagogical expertise as a Hollyhock Fellow! Currently, he is the AP US Government & Politics network lesson planner for North Star Academy and Uncommon Schools, and teaches that course and AP US History at North Star Academy Washington Park High School in Newark, NJ. He is also an Instructional Leader in the History Department, and has been a grade level leader and a leader of the schools Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Team. Duncan's teaching superpower is building strong and lasting relationships that carry students to and through their collegiate success!


Duncan Miller

North Star Academy Washington Park HS, Newark NJ
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David Nasser

Uncommon Charter High School,  Brooklyn, NY

This fall David will be entering his 20th year as a teacher. He teaches AP Government and Politics at Uncommon Charter High School in Brooklyn, NY. His career has included stints teaching bilingual elementary, middle school social studies, and AP World History. His teaching power is also a valuable life skill: finding a Simpsons quote to match any lesson.


David Nasser

Uncommon Charter High School,  Brooklyn, NY
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Deadra Nelson-Mason

KIPP College Prep High School, Bronx, NY

Deadra Nelson-Mason is honored to have engaged in the joy of teaching for over 20 years. Viewing teaching as a method of social justice activism, her career as history and performing arts educator spans several urban centers in the United States beginning in Chicago and 16 years in NYC. She now teaches at KIPP College Prep High School. Deadra has been fortunate to have combined her careers in education and the performing arts as visiting lecturer at Indiana University and creating integrated arts curriculum in high schools. She is grateful that her careers as educator, dancer, vocalist, and actor are centered on the self-actualization of youth.


Deadra Nelson-Mason

KIPP College Prep High School, Bronx, NY
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Kelly Noh

Achievement First Brooklyn High School, Brooklyn, NY

Growing up in Queens, NY, Kelly Noh, was awe-struck by the passion her teachers brought into the classroom. They inspired her to love learning, and enriched her mind with helpful knowledge, sparking her curiosity in various subjects. Because learning was engaging, she excelled in her academics and was given the invaluable opportunity to go to Binghamton University on a scholarship. After graduating from Binghamton University she proceeded to enroll in the Relay Graduate School of Education based in New York to pursue teaching.

 

She is  currently the AP U.S. History teacher at Achievement First Brooklyn High School. In addition to teaching the course for 3 years, she has worked as a Course Lead for the high school U.S. History department across the Achievement First network. She has also crafted and led professional development sessions.


Kelly Noh

Achievement First Brooklyn High School, Brooklyn, NY
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Brian O’Neil

Food and Finance High School, Manhattan, NY

Brian O'Neill is a New York City Social Studies teacher and Social Studies curriculum writer. Having previously worked on the NYC DOE's Passport to Social Studies Curriculum writing team, he currently teaches AP US History and Global history at the Food and Finance High School. Social justice, civil rights, and our constitutional principles are always at the forefront of his Social Studies lessons. Brian is also the Humanities Chairman at his school helping to oversee and guide their English and Social Studies departments.


Brian O’Neil

Food and Finance High School, Manhattan, NY
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Joe Pechie

Urban Assembly for Media Studies High School, Manhattan, NY

Joe Pechie teaches at Urban Assembly for Media Studies High School. He has taught US and AP US History for 7 years. His teaching superpower is forming really strong bonds with his students and taking a personal interest in his students as people. While the content is what often is seen as what's most important in a social studies classroom, for him it's the dialogue and discussion that really pushes the most thinking. Building strong relationships based on trust and a personal connection allows him to push his students' thinking and hopefully get them to have a deeper understanding of this country's history. He also amazes his students by drinking his coffee without any cream or sugar.


Joe Pechie

Urban Assembly for Media Studies High School, Manhattan, NY
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Elliott Stern

KIPP NYC College Prep High School, Bronx, NY

Elliott Stern is a government and economics teacher at KIPP NYC College Prep High School. He has been at KIPP for 7 years, and before that taught for 2 years in Philadelphia and for a year in Medellin, Colombia. He has a passion for civic education and loves working with young people. His Teaching Superpower is the ability to take a classroom of students and transform it into an environment where students are excited about learning, asking a million questions, and feeling free to speak their minds!


Elliott Stern

KIPP NYC College Prep High School, Bronx, NY
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Emily Wooldrige

High School of Arts and Technology, Manhattan, NY

When Emily Wooldridge was at Brown University, she was inspired to make college level history topics accessible to high school students. She has been a 10th grade Global Studies II teacher at the High School of Arts and Technology for the past 4 years. She was a radio journalist before becoming a teacher, so storytelling and local history greatly inform her teaching practice. Since she grew up in rural Washington State, she is also interested in the connection between rural and urban public schools. Her teaching super power is building relationships and asking higher-order questions.


Emily Wooldrige

High School of Arts and Technology, Manhattan, NY

Nominate a Teacher

Do you know a teacher or teachers who would be interested in this program? Nominate them, and we will reach out personally to invite them to apply!

Fill out the nomination form

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Questions?

Contact us to inquire about the Hollyhock Humanities Fellowship.